Join us at The Truck, the Brewer, and the Blogger IV Pop-Up Dinner on January 20th!

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Glen Breton Single Malt: Whisk(e)y Wednesday presented by Calandro's Supermarket

Glen Breton Single Malt
Jeremy, one our Raise a Glass team and contributors to Whisk(e)y Wednesday scores, actually visited the Glen Breton distillery in Nova Scotia recently.  Makers of Canada's only single malt whisky (Scotch style), this Glen Breton had 10 years of aging but certainly could have used a few more.  The nose carried fragrances of sweet and tart apples.  Jeremy noted the breakfast cereal Apple Jacks with the toasted cereal grains and apple flavor.  On the taste the fruit turned into a slightly metallic tinge with traces of smoke.  With light wood, the narrow flavor profile faded quickly for me.  James described the Glen Breton Single Malt as a "palate tickler" while Eric noted the smooth and unique finish with a bit of a burn.  The whisky certainly has a lot going on though it could also use a few more years in the barrel.  Overall our group liked it a good bit, and will definitely be interested in trying more aged versions of the Glen Breton Single Malt Canadian Whisky.  

Glen Breton Single Malt

73.5 Average Score


Whisk(e)y Wednesday is a blog post series on Bite and Booze sponsored by Calandro's Supermarket. Calandro's has one of Baton Rouge's best selections of bourbon, Scotch, and other whisk(e)ys as well as wine and craft beer. WW is created and rated by the hosts of Raise a Glass. Scores are marked for Nose, Taste, Finish, and Balance and Complexity using our own propriatary scoring system. Marks are then added and averaged, leaving us with a final score out of a 100 point scale. Our scale should be looked at on the full range of 0-100 rather than an academic range where 70 is passing and anything less is failing. A 50 should be considered a very mediocre whisk(e)y while anything below 20 is absolute horse piss and anything above 90 is rather extraordinary.


Monday, October 29, 2012

Louisiana Feast of Fields 2012

There's an exciting dinner coming on November 9th that I'd like to pass along to you.  I won't be cooking this one, but you better believe the food will be excellent.  Plus, this is the kind of event that contributes to a food culture that we so desperately want more of in the Red Stick.  The Louisiana Feast of Fields 2012 is a dinner which will bring together local farmers and chefs to create an inspired meal at the Burden Center, part of the LSU Rural Life Museum off of Essen.  The LSU Ag Center property will play host to Chef Ryan Andre (from Le Creole) and his team from the Louisiana Culinary Institute and more.  They'll create a five course meal paired with wines from the Pontchartrain Vineyards.  Dr. Mike Strain, Louisiana's Agriculture Commissioner, will be there as well to say a few words.  The "Gastronomic Gala" is sure to be a palate-pleasing triumph of a feast that you won't want to miss!  Plus, all proceeds go towards the Burden Center and LCI's non-profit fund which will help train future culinarians and continue to increase the quality of our cuisine in the capital region.  You can also read a little more about the dinner from 225's Maggie Richardson. I look forward to seeing you there!


Friday, October 26, 2012

Brash Brewing/Clown Shoes Beer Dinner at Juban's

Ladies and Gentlemen, there's an exciting beer dinner coming up in Baton Rouge that you NEED to know about!  The great folks at Juban's, a Baton Rouge Original, are putting on a very unique beer dinner that is going to be PHENOMENAL!  Chef Jaime Hernandez and I tasted some beers from Brash Brewing and Clown Shoes Beer, which are some of the most inventive craft brewers out there.  The dinner will be on Thursday, November 1, 2012 with reception at 6:15 and dinner at 7:00.  Ben Fullelove, owner of Brash Brewing, will be in attendance to talk about his beers and the story of why he is based in Texas, contract brews in Massachusetts, and releases his beer in Louisiana.  And the beer is astonishingly delicious!  Check the menu below.  You won't want to miss it!


Resevations:  225-346-8422
$75 per person (Includes Tax and Gratuity)

Amuse

Brash Brewing Texas Exile, Imperial Brown Sugar Oatmeal Porter
The Bullocks Imperial India Pale Ale
House Made Charcuterie with Accoutrements
Oysters en Brochette, local honey glaze
Belle Ecorce Farms Chevre Tempura, banana jam, dark chocolate

Course 1

Clown Shoes Belgian India Pale Ale
Orecchiette Puttanesca
Fresh pacific sardines, marinated olives, fresh jarred tomato sauce

Course 2

Brash Item Nine Ale
Roasted Bone Marrow
Honey bourbon brine, market pepper chow chow, crostini

Course 3

Clown Shoes Chocolate Sombrero Mexican Chocolate Stout
Pork Tamale
Braised Iverstine farms pork shanks, pecan mole sauce, wrapped in fresh banana leaves

Course 4

Clown Shoes Clementine 1.5 Double White Ale
Fromage et Saucisson
Sharp white cheddar and pimento mousse, rabbit boudin blanc, satsuma marmalade

Course 5

Clown Shoes / Brash Brewing Double Brown Bourbon Barrel Aged Imperial Stout
Red Velvet Cake
Nanette Mayhall’s famous cake, cream cheese icing, toasted pecans

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Penderyn Single Malt: Whisk(e)y Wednesday presented by Calandro's Supermarket


Penderyn Single Malt Whisky
Penderyn Single Malt Welsh Whisky made it to the final four of the Raise a Glass Whisk(e)ys of the World Tournament, but it didn't do nearly as well during our latest taste test.  The spirit from Wales rang in with a fairly average score, suggesting that perhaps it had an easier road in the bracketology.  The pale-colored whisky's nose comes across as slightly metalic with light aromas of honeysuckle.  On taste it is by all means good, but not great.  It is smooth with biscuity malts.  Penderyn brings a low heat and lingering warmth on the finish.  I likened it to a little kid on the good whisky playground.  James noted that Penderyn is too rough to be an Irish while while only being a shadow of a Scotch.  Despite being stuck between the two, Jeremy still proclaimed that Penderyn is solid and by all means the best Welsh whisky.  It certainly is approved to add to your collection.

Penderyn Single Malt

73.25 Average Score


Whisk(e)y Wednesday is a blog post series on Bite and Booze sponsored by Calandro's Supermarket. Calandro's has one of Baton Rouge's best selections of bourbon, Scotch, and other whisk(e)ys as well as wine and craft beer. WW is created and rated by the hosts of Raise a Glass. Scores are marked for Nose, Taste, Finish, and Balance and Complexity using our own propriatary scoring system. Marks are then added and averaged, leaving us with a final score out of a 100 point scale. Our scale should be looked at on the full range of 0-100 rather than an academic range where 70 is passing and anything less is failing. A 50 should be considered a very mediocre whisk(e)y while anything below 20 is absolute horse piss and anything above 90 is rather extraordinary.


Monday, October 22, 2012

A Couple Pints at The Barley Oak

Nola Irish Channel Stout
Parish Envie Pale Ale
If anybody out there reading this post doesn't know about The Barley Oak in Mandeville, you're sadly missing out on one of the best craft beer bars in Louisiana.  Sitting right on the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain, this "Old World Draught Haus" offers a lovely view, and I'm not just talking about their tap handles.  While passing through recently, I decided that I ought to stop and have a few pints as well as a little lunch.  Fortunately for me, they had a couple local brews that are actually quite rare.  I began with the seasonal Irish Channel Stout from Nola.  The Barley Oak had it on a Nitro tap.  The dark, delicious stout poured out with a gorgeously cascading tan head.  The beer is absolutely my kind of brew.  It is rich and flavorful yet ridiculously drinkable and refreshing to me.  I challenge anybody who has a thing against "dark beer" to grab a pint of this stout if they ever see it out.  Upon finishing my pint of stout, I noticed a tap handle from the Parish Brewing Company that did not say Canebrake.  I asked Vanessa behind the bar, who immediately poured me a Parish Envie Pale Ale before I could even ask.  This beer, which really hasn't been released yet to the masses, was leftover (seemingly just for me) from a special tapping.  I've had this beer from Andrew Godley before, but never in a bar.  It is an American Pale Ale which certainly comes across as hoppy but not quite as out of balance towards bitter as a lot of IPAs do.  I found the Envie to be a great beer-drinker's-beer.  If you like craft beer, then it'll be for you.  And if you don't, then I'm surprised you're reading this blog!

A Reuben at The Barley Oak
For some bites to go with my booze, I opted for The Barley Oak's Reuben sandwich.  The corned beef with Swiss and sauerkraut on marble rye definitely did the trick.  I like sandwiches that combine textures and flavors in a simple yet harmonious way.  Sometimes a sandwich can be a little underrated, but never in my book if it is grub like this!  Thanks Barley Oak.  I'll be back for more bite and booze soon!

The Barley Oak on Urbanspoon

Friday, October 19, 2012

New Dining: The Club at LSU Union Square

The Club at LSU Union Square
Back when I attended LSU (don't I sound old now?), I dined somewhat regularly at the Faculty Club.  Most students didn't realize that they could eat there on their lunch breaks between class, so it wasn't too difficult to find a table and eat some decent food as opposed to the fast-food-court at the Union.  I've also attended several wedding receptions at the Faculty Club, so the place holds a special spot in my heart.  Recently, the Faculty Club underwent a face lift and is now re-branded as The Club at LSU Union Square.  I received an invite to come check it out for myself, so of course, I accepted!  The new menu shows off features some pretty stellar dishes and a reasonable wine list... something that I don't recall seeing before.  The menu began with some rotating specials.  I opted for the Seafood Amuse Trio with a stuffed oyster, cucumber crab shooter, and chili glazed fried shrimp on a green tomato puree.  The shrimp stole the show as my favorite of the three, but they were all tantalizing treats to get the meal started.  

Club Scallops
After a couple satisfying salads including a blue cheese wedge and a caprese, it was off to the main courses.  I went for the Club Scallops.  The plate could use some work with its color, but ultimately the dish fared pretty well.  The seared scallops sat atop caramelized onion and fennel.  Off to one side a pile of sweet potato puree graced the plate.  The other side came highlighted with a pool of saffron beurre blanc.  All but one of the scallops had a nice golden sear.  I don't know what happened to the lone fella.  They did all manage to have a great flavor.  The onions and fennel paired very well with the buttery wine sauce and the sweetness of the delicacy from the sea.  The sweet potato puree, while quite tasty, didn't quite seem to fit.  A little green vegetable could have helped with both the plating and tying the dish together.



Counting Sheep
Michele spied the Counting Sheep entree on the menu before I did so I generously let her place the order for it.  The duo of double bone curry dusted  lamb chops crowned separate helpings of mango chutney.  Sweet potato puree also came with the lamb, though the menu called for a Yukon Gold mash.  That being said, the sweet potatoes went nicely with the mango chutney and the gaminess of the lamb.  The little garnish of micro-greens helped the plating as well.  And the best part: the lamb had an excellent sear and a beautiful medium-rare finish.  They pleased the palate with the curry spices and rich flavor.  Unfortunately we ran out of time for dessert because we had to get downtown, but I'm not sure my stomach could have... well, it could have... should have taken much more.  In the end we had a very nice meal right on LSU's campus, and I would most definitely consider returning to The Club at LSU Union Square before events on LSU's campus in the Union, Swine Palace, or any other venue.

The Club at LSU Union Square on Urbanspoon

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Gentleman Jack: Whisk(e)y Wednesday presented by Calandro's Supermarket

Gentleman Jack
Our Raise a Glass crew recently scored a Tennessee Whiskey from the Jack Daniels distillery: Gentleman Jack.  Claiming to be a "rare" Tennessee Whiskey, this 80 proof elixir is most definitely palatable.  The nose is mellow with aromas of honey and maple.  The taste presents itself with very smooth tones of oak and vanilla.  It is pleasant, easy drinking, and ultimately rather boring.  Especially on the finish where, being a gentleman, the whiskey departs without lingering at the door for a kiss.  As far as balance and complexity goes, the charcoal filtering took too much away as the whiskey lacks any interesting mix of flavors.  It is boring... smooth and simple, but boring.  If you're looking for a cross between a bourbon and a Canadian whiskey, maybe you'll really enjoy it.  If you're looking for complex and intriguing whiskies, look elsewhere.

Gentleman Jack

67.5 Average Score


Whisk(e)y Wednesday is a blog post series on Bite and Booze sponsored by Calandro's Supermarket. Calandro's has one of Baton Rouge's best selections of bourbon, Scotch, and other whisk(e)ys as well as wine and craft beer. WW is created and rated by the hosts of Raise a Glass. Scores are marked for Nose, Taste, Finish, and Balance and Complexity using our own propriatary scoring system. Marks are then added and averaged, leaving us with a final score out of a 100 point scale. Our scale should be looked at on the full range of 0-100 rather than an academic range where 70 is passing and anything less is failing. A 50 should be considered a very mediocre whisk(e)y while anything below 20 is absolute horse piss and anything above 90 is rather extraordinary.


Monday, October 15, 2012

Vending Machine Winery Pop-Up Restaurant at Roux Wine and Spirits

For anybody who has been waiting to eat my food again (or for the first time), you're in luck!  On Thursday, October 25th I'll be cooking a pop-up wine dinner at Roux Wine and Spirits in Prairieville.  Along with Chef Brian Medlin for All-Star Catering and Smokin' Aces Barbecue, we'll cook up my menu inspired by wines from the Vending Machine Winery and vending machines themselves.  Each dish will have some item found in vending machines incorporated into it.  Neil and Monica Gernon from Vending Machine Winery will be there to talk about the wines as well!


Course 3: Ruckus
Course 1: Ballyhoo
Double Shotgun: 50% Petit Verdot, 50% Cabernet Franc

Spinach, Arugula, Pickled Pears, Belle Ecorce Goat Cheese, Forte Grove Brioche Toast, Balsamic Skittles Vinaigrette

Course 2: Hoopla
Loula’s Revenge: 100 % Old Vine Chardonnay

Tuna Tartare with Cucumber served on Zapp’s Original Potato Chips with a Wasabi Aioli
Course 4: Kerfuffle
Cornmeal Dusted Catfish Nugget over Zapp’s Cajun Crawtators with Creole Tartar Sauce
Chili-Lime Shrimp Ceviche atop Zapp’s Hotter ‘n Hot Jalapeno Chips with Cilantro Crema

Course 3: Ruckus 
Crooked Mayor: 100 % Cabernet Sauvignon

Hershey’s Dark Chocolate Mole Braised Beef Short Ribs over Creamed Corn Polenta
 
Course 4: Kerfuffle 
Horror Show: 34% Sousao, 33% Montepulciano, 33% Tannat

Chocolate Panna Cotta topped with Ground Honey Maid Graham Crackers and Marshmallow Foam

To sign up for the event, purchase your tickets through the Roux Wine Eventbrite Page.  There are only 30 seats available, and at least half of them are already sold at the time I'm writing this!

Friday, October 12, 2012

Tin Roof Launches the Parade Ground Coffee Porter

It's here.  With the debut at Happy's Irish Pub downtown and the Bulldog on Perkins this past Tuesday followed by stops in New Orleans and at The Barley Oak on the Northshore, Tin Roof has now officially launched their first fall seasonal: The Parade Ground Coffee Porter.  The Parade Ground is a ode to the iconic field on LSU's campus, Louisiana's parading culture, and the grinding of coffee beans.  It is a dark, rich beer with plenty of coffee in the aroma.  On taste it contains a pleasant coffee bite that warms your mouth with enough balance from the malts to prevent any unwelcome bitterness, though the coffee and hops are most certainly present.  The beer is best enjoyed chilled, but certainly not ice cold, so please do yourself a favor and alert any unknowing bartender that you'd like a non-frosted glass.  If you get a chance, do a little beer education while you're at it.  32 degrees is not the ideal drinking temperature of good beer.  Try it in the low 50s for maximum flavor and palate pleasing effects!

The Parade Ground Porter is the fifth official beer to come out of Tin Roof, following their flagship brands of Perfect Tin Amber Ale, Voodoo Bengal Specialty Pale Ale, Bandit Blonde Ale, and this past summer's Watermelon Wheat Ale.  Speaking of, if you find a taproom that has Watermelon Wheat on tap still, do everyone a favor and drink a pint.  The sooner they finish those kegs, the sooner they'll get the coffee porter on!

Finally... while there isn't an official sign up just yet, Chef Aaron Brown from Taco de Paco and I will be doing another Pop-Up Beer Dinner at the Tin Roof Brewery on Thursday, November 29th.  This one will be titled "Louisiana Re-Imagined," and the Coffee Porter will, of course, be featured.  If you are interested in attending, please email me at jay@biteandbooze.com and I'll be sure to let you know as soon as the Eventbrite page has launched!

Cheers!

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Powers Special Reserve 12: Whisk(e)y Wednesday presented by Calandro's Supermarket

Powers Special Reserve 12 Irish Whiskey
Powers Special Reserve 12 year Irish Whiskey made a strong showing with our Raise a Glass judges, earning a lofty 83 average score.  Anything in the 80s is definitely a very drinkable whisk(e)y, and Powers is certainly no exception.  Fruits of fig, honey dew, and cantaloupe filled the nose as well as a little lemon zest in a surprise citrus showing.  The taste had a smooth and toasted profile.  I likened it to toasted Honey Nut Cheerios.  Eric found to be mellow with a little spice while James found notes of caramel and butter.  It finished smooth with a gradual creaminess and superb mouth-feel.  The Powers Gold Label Special Reserve 12 year carried a lovely balance of flavors between sweet, fruity, toasty, and spicy.  The complexity clearly found its home in this Irish whiskey too, which can be rare for the style.  Definitely a whiskey worthy of adding to any collection looking for more variety in Irish spirits. 

Powers Special Reserve 12 Irish Whiskey

83.0 Average Score


Whisk(e)y Wednesday is a blog post series on Bite and Booze sponsored by Calandro's Supermarket. Calandro's has one of Baton Rouge's best selections of bourbon, Scotch, and other whisk(e)ys as well as wine and craft beer. WW is created and rated by the hosts of Raise a Glass. Scores are marked for Nose, Taste, Finish, and Balance and Complexity using our own propriatary scoring system. Marks are then added and averaged, leaving us with a final score out of a 100 point scale. Our scale should be looked at on the full range of 0-100 rather than an academic range where 70 is passing and anything less is failing. A 50 should be considered a very mediocre whisk(e)y while anything below 20 is absolute horse piss and anything above 90 is rather extraordinary.


Monday, October 8, 2012

Bon Repas Truck and a Pink Party!

Sommer Wadsworth on the Bon Repas Truck
In case you've been living under a rock during past couple months, there's a new food truck roaming the streets of Baton Rouge that you really can't miss. Bon Repas is currently a bright pink mobile food vending establishment that came over from nearby Lafayette.  Owners Chris and Sommer Wadsworth started the truck in the heart of Cajun Country slinging wraps. However, when Chris took a gig as the Executive Chef of Restaurant IPO in downtown Baton Rouge, Sommer and truck came along for the ride.  They re-branded the truck with the pink facade and a deep fryer for homemade empanadas.  The pink truck is definitely and ode to girl power as it sports a crew of women with serious chops to run the truck.  They also use the pink as a sign of charitable giving to support breast cancer research.  You really can't go wrong eating an empanada for a good cause!

An Empanada from the Bon Repas Truck
I recently tracked down Bon Repas at a Wednesday Food Truck Wround-up where I ordered my first empanada from Sommer.  I opted for the Blue Pig: a mixture of chorizo and blue cheese stuffed inside a delicious pastry shell and deep fried until golden brown.  The empanada dough had a magical balance between being tender and flaky and being rugged enough to hold up to the fillings.  The chorizo had a great spice blend then contrasted beautifully with the blue cheese.  I'll be back for more, for sure!

The Blue Pig: A Chorizo and Blue Cheese Empanada
Meanwhile, Chef Chris Wadsworth at Restaurant IPO is doing his part as well.  On October 18th he's doing his first ever Pink Party cooking demo upstairs at The Office bar.  You definitely shouldn't miss this great event.  Check out the details below and sign up now before it is sold out!



Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Canadian Club Small Batch Classic 12: Whisk(e)y Wednesday presented by Calandro's Supermarket

Canadian Club Small Batch Classic 12
Canada, eh?  Whisk(e)y Wednesday goes north with Canadian Club Small Batch Classic 12 blended Canadian Whiskey.  A faint maple syrup aroma arises from the glass of blended Canadian whiskey.  The flavor of maple persists on the palate with a smooth and easy drinking character.  The whiskey is tasty but ultimately boring.  It has one note all the way through and lacks complexity.  While it is adequate in nose, taste, and finish, it leaves nothing to the imagination and as James put it, is "engineered to please."  The mild flavor is typical of Canadian Whiskey and while those who like smooth blends from the North may really like Canadian Club Small Batch Classic 12, our Raise a Glass crew was ultimately somewhat disappointed in the complexity for a 12 year.  Easy to drink and inoffensive in every way, but also uninteresting to a real connoisseur.

Canadian Club Small Batch Classic 12 Year

66.75 Average Score


Whisk(e)y Wednesday is a blog post series on Bite and Booze sponsored by Calandro's Supermarket. Calandro's has one of Baton Rouge's best selections of bourbon, Scotch, and other whisk(e)ys as well as wine and craft beer. WW is created and rated by the hosts of Raise a Glass. Scores are marked for Nose, Taste, Finish, and Balance and Complexity using our own propriatary scoring system. Marks are then added and averaged, leaving us with a final score out of a 100 point scale. Our scale should be looked at on the full range of 0-100 rather than an academic range where 70 is passing and anything less is failing. A 50 should be considered a very mediocre whisk(e)y while anything below 20 is absolute horse piss and anything above 90 is rather extraordinary.


Monday, October 1, 2012

Recap: Post Olympics Beer Dinner at The Londoner

Tripel Karmeliet and La Trappe Quad
The Londoner, on the appropriately named Sherwood Forest Boulevard (actually, while Sherwood Forest is famous due to Robin Hood lure in England, it isn't that close to London, but still...) in Baton Rouge, recently had me over to help host a beer dinner.  We did four courses with eight beers from around the world shortly after the Summer Olympics ended in aforementioned London.  Each of the four courses were paired with two beers of similar style from different countries.  The first course featured the famous Belgian treat of mussels and frites with Belgian style ales from Belgium and the Netherlands.  The mussels had a wonderfully flavorful broth with tomatoes, basil, and bacon.  We paired them with the Tripel Karmeliet from Belgium and the La Trappe Quad, which is actually a Trappist brewery in the Netherlands.  While the Tripel and Quadrupel are technically two different styles, they still showed of what that Belgian yeast and malt profile can taste like with its signature fruitiness and balance.

Tuna Duo with White Ales
Our second course stayed in the sea but in a far different way than the mussels and frites.  Utilizing white ales from both the USA and Japan, we created two tuna dishes on one plate meant to emulate the cuisine from those counties.  The tuna tartare with cucumber was served on a crispy wonton with sesame oil and toasted sesame seeds.  The obvious Asian flare partnered with the Hitachino Nest White Ale, widely considered to be one of the best beers of its style in the country.  On the American side we plated a seared ahi tuna to go with the Clown Shoes Clementine.  Both dishes were executed very well by Chef Cole at the Londoner and the beer choices were spot on.
 
Lamb Chops and English Style India Pale Ales



The main course featured a delicacy in both England and New Zealand: Lamb.  The beautifully cooked medium rare lamb chops were served with a bit of mashed potatoes.  Accompanying the lamb were a couple of English style India pale ales.  Not quite the hop bomb that American IPAs are, the Tuatara from New Zealand and the Meantime from England both helped cut through the gaminess of the tender lamb.  This, hands down, ended up being my favorite course of the meal both because of the superb sear and seasoning on the lamb and the pairing with the English style IPAs.  It was like both of these beers were meant to be served with lamb... and since they come from countries with a lot of love for eating sheep, perhaps they are!

Dessert with a Russian Imperial Stout and Scottish Porter



Dinner ended with a nice pairing as well.  Norway's Nøgne Ø Imperial Stout poured dark and rich with strong booze and hints of espresso, chocolate, and dark fruit.  While not the same beer style, the Harviestoun Old Engine Oil Black Ale, technically a Porter, out of Scotland also poured incredibly dark (hence the name) with flavors of coffee and dark chocolate.  It only made sense to compliment the flavors of the beer with a chocolate dessert and the sweetness from some fruit.  The Londoner's pastry chef whipped up some stunning chocolate and raspberry tarts that were exactly what these two beers needed.  While not the same style and vastly different up close, the tart played off of flavor notes in each beer to deliver a great ending to the meal.



I enjoyed being able to help the Londoner out with some different beer and food pairings.  All of these beers came from my friend Natalie with International Wine and Spirits.  Look for them at Calandro's Supermarket or wherever fine beers are sold!  And also keep an eye out for some future beer dinners at The Londoner.  You never know who might be making an appearance!